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Presentation

Story Writing Tune Up

Earlier this month, I was asked to make a presentation on story writing. The material needed to cater to an experienced team; I aimed to provide advanced techniques while revisiting some of the basics of story writing. The presentation was a hit, and the team loved the content. I put together my first narrated power point show for the world to view. Enjoy! Many thanks to Arjay Hinek and Catherine Louis; much of their work served as an inspiration in putting this together.

 

User Stories Tune Up Presentation
User Stories Tune Up Presentation
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Article

New Publication on Cutter IT Journal

In January, I was approached by the Cutter IT Journal about writing a follow-up to my October 2014 print article, Agile Team 0. Seeing this as an excellent opportunity to take a retrospective approach on the team, I put something together. You’ll need a subscription to Cutter; fortunately, I can forward the article via email if interested. You can also sign up for a free trial; they have some very good content.

 

http://www.cutter.com/content/itjournal/fulltext/advisor/2015/itj150211.html

Categories
Quickpost

Picture for Your Thoughts

Everyday, my father sends me a ‘Daily Starter’. Many of them are filled with inspirational quotes and words of wisdom. However, this simple picture hit home one morning. I think Steinbeck said it best in Of Mice and Men: “The best laid plans of mice and men often go astray”.

image003

Traditional sequential delivery models lay out the entire plan at the beginning of a project- illustrated by the top photo. However, the bottom photo clearly illustrates the world of software development; it actually looks like a pleasant and scenic route compared to what software professionals really endure. If adopting an iterative approach can be so obviously illustrated, why aren’t most organizations so reluctant to change?